Posted
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I ended up here after spending a few too many apt-get installs to get Xorg working.

For the record, this ended up being the wildly correct solution:

$ sudo apt-get remove --purge nvidia-*

Man, proprietary drivers mess up GNU/Linux quickly...

Links:

  • None, because there don't seem to be any good articles on this, as xorg is a disaster at the best of times

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Categories gnu/linux

Posted
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I'm not the fondest of closed-source software like Resilio Sync, but that said, it's sure fast at syncing data. My tests of NextCloud over the weekend were disappointing.

Way back when, I used ownCloud to host my own data. Eventually, I had to abandon it for another system, when my hosting software fell out of date and its features slowly stopped working. As near as I can tell, NextCloud is either the fork of ownCloud, or the follow-through of the intervening years of development, I'm not sure.

Unfortunately, it doesn't appear NextCloud is any less forgiving in terms of dependency requirements. So don't get your hopes up there. It's also just as slow as ever, whether because of PHP or WebDav, I'm not entirely sure. The end result is that Resilio Sync is usable on my (admittedly bad) connection.

NextCloud isn't.

I also wanted to try Seafile, but that project is such a disastrous mess I am staying as far away from it as possible. I started to install it, saw it needed three MySQL databases just to function, and backed out. Forget that. I'm after "simplicity" at the best of times, I don't need file encryption filesystems on top of my existing VPS filesystem, thank you very bloody much...

Links:

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Categories software, gnu/linux

Posted

I'm using it on both my beige box self-built tower, as well as a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B, and both are doing admirably.

I had to update the desktop system to get the RPi going, as e2fsprogs was too old on my netbook to get the partitions on the RPi microSD as I wanted them. :)

Here's my i3-wm desktop

Simplicity and tiling are some of my favourite things, if you can't tell.

Author

Posted

I've been using Devuan as a daily driver OS for about a month now, off and on.

A few weeks back, I finally switched my main desktop (gaming machine grade tower, basically) over from Windows 10. Yes, it's so much nicer!

I have a bunch of Debian 7/8/9 machines kicking around already, but having seen how gosh-awful systemd is to work with, I'm done with that distro... at least until the people working on it are considerably less hostile to anyone who isn't interested in using that disaster area on their production machine(s).

I mean I thought the whole point of FOSS/open source was to give users choice. systemd definitely stands against that in every way possible, and the Debian maintainers seem happy with that status quo.

I am not.

At any rate, Devuan 1.0 Jessie has been out for a while, and I've been using it as a drop-in replacement without issue. I guess I wasn't looking all that carefully when I was choosing whether or not to use it, as I didn't notice 2.0 ASCII is out now! As I only got this machine working the way I wanted a week or two ago, it seemed silly not to at least TRY doing a dist-upgrade() and see how smoothly it went.

I'm still on the old kernel, as of this writing, so the results will have to wait a bit. I hope it's not too bad to resolve the issues that invariably crop up. Having perused the dist release notes, I feel fairly well prepared.

As an aside, I use i3-wm on top of xorg, sans display manager, and am a heavy, heavy command line user. I have already played with ASCII a bit on my Surface, so I know a few of the gotchas related to the software packages upon which I generally depend. My set-up required 1376 packages for a dist-upgrade, and the download size was about 850 or so MB. That's not dreadful, and as I use apt-cacher-ng, any future machines requesting the same packages won't take nearly as long. So yay!

I'll return when I have more news!

Author
Categories gnu/linux, goodness